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getting hammered. we had a tornado warning earlier this afternoon for rockville, maryland. that has expired. but these storms are now working their way across the chesapeak i wouldn't be surprised if we get more warnings issued with these storms as we advance through the rest of the evening hours. here's what's happening in terms of the heat. we still have the heat advisories for much of the east, the south, stretching into alabama, into georgia. where it feels like it's 110 degrees even. and there are a lot of places yesterday that actually soared to record highs. and you can see it here. richmond, virginia, for example, what a hot summer it's been for you, up to 105 degrees yesterday. so some really hot numbers there. baltimore, up to 100, raleigh up to 100 as well. and in new york's central park. 97 degrees, it's been a stretch a long stretch of hot weather and the storms have only been providing some relief, really. because it tends to get hot once again. i can tell you that tomorrow you'll get an improvement and you'll see a reduction in humidity but it won't be a dramatic chan
gets the house, the car. but who gets the dog? how one divorce case in maryland may change the way pets are viewed when a marriage splits up. carol costello's got a "gut check" for us ahead. >>> checkin this morning. as we cross the half-hour, three employees at the u.s. embassy in paris are being treated for poisoning after opening their mail citing a french police source, reuters says the exact nature of the poisonings is not yet known. the source also did not know the seriousness of the employees' condition. no comment yet from the u.s. embassy. >>> turns out the number of graves mislabeled or mismarked at arlington national cemetery is way more than originally thought. as many as 6,600 graves at arlington may have been affected in this. the army's previous estimate is much smaller. around 211 plots at the military burial ground. >>> this is now the deadliest month for u.s. troops in afghanistan since the war began nine years ago. in the past 24 hours, nato says three american soldiers were killed in two different blasts in southern afghanistan. that brings july's death toll to 63. >
in gaithersburg, maryland, about 20 miles north we have of the nation's capitol. the quake was felt by as many as 3 million people in the mid-atlantic region. there were no reports of injuries or damage, but residents flooded 911 lines to report the rumbling. let's get more now from someone who actually felt it. cnn producer trish chicka, who was at home in kensington, maryland, when the quake hit and joins us right now on the phone. what did you feel and hear? >> caller: hi, fredricka. i had just gotten out of the shower at the time, and all of a sudden i felt you know, my -- the bottom of the tub was vibrating. the low, deep rumble. the windows, or the window flight my shower, it was rattling. it felt like a train or a huge truck was going by, but, of course, i would have had to been right outside my window if that were the case. it didn't make any sense, and i felt this momentary, maybe low level feeling of panic. i'm in the shower. i'm thinking, that's kind of a vulnerable place to be. should i -- >> were you thinking, this is a tremor? an earthquake? or thinking something else was going o
. we do have a bit of news for you, coming from the state of maryland, where there was a heat-related death reported there. the governor urging people toe take whatever steps necessary to stay cool. meanwhile, here in new york city, we checked in with con edison. we had time to spend at their command center and saw the steps they're taking to try to keep the power on. >> reporter: day four of the northeast heat wave brought some lower temperatures but not low enough in boston. >> one thing about people from here, we're not that bunch of wimps, we'll take it. >> reporter: record highs in some cities, including wilmington an philadelphia. the cities pools, filling to capacity. >> it's refreshing, it's cool. and it's keeping us from passing out in the sun. >> reporter: demand for power, a concern-n for new york where con edison has been running the emergency respond center since tuesday. inside the war room, wares departments work together to prevent blackouts. >> as you take a look around the room, you can see the center is broken up in sections. you've got logistics, customer s
. our congressional correspondent is here. you went to that district on the eastern shore of maryland? >> yeah. this is maryland a 's first congressional district, republican leaning but the democrat frank kratovil won in 2008. he'll likely face a familiar opponent in republican andy harris. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> reporter: what a difference a year and a half makes. but will it make a difference here? this is one of the most competitive congressional races in the country and republicans say if they're going to pick up the seats they need to take back control of the house of representatives, they must win here. in 2008 democrat frank kratovil beat republican andy harris, a state senator. but just barely, by less than 1% of the vote. and 2010 looks like a rematch. this is a time when politically it's pretty difficult to be a democrat. >> it is but, you know, this has always been kind of a middle of the road district. >> reporter: that's why kratovil talking here with local manufacturers is emphasizing his independence. >> we have to
history making high. record temperatures also recorded in connecticut, maryland, virginia, and pennsylvania. in fact, in philadelphia 92-year-old woman was found dead in her apartment by a neighbor. she did not have air conditioning and only had a few windows only. >> rob marciano be is tracking the heat wave from the extreme weather center in atlanta in a moment and will let us know what to expect today and for the rest of the week. let's begin with jason carol on the streets of new york where they are feeling the heat. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. you were out here yesterday. you know how hot it was. bracing for more heat today. at 6:01 a.m., already 86 degrees. yesterday, john, it was the hottest july 6th ever. 103 degrees here in central park but some good news, relief is on the way. those on the east coast didn't need to see triple digit temperatures to know how hot it was. they felt it. >> i'm melting. >> this is very hot. we're not used to this. >> so hot in new jersey a state of emergency is declared. while in new york city, concern customers will crank
? that's in bethesda, maryland. that's a d.c. suburb. the median household income in bethesda is over $172,000. >> wow. >> it's an interesting town. it is of course very close to d.c. 1 of every 2 people in bethesda has a graduate degree. we know that the more education you have, the higher income. that makes a lot of sense, and it is a nice town, too. >> you've heard the saying rich, single and ready to mingle. i can't believe this is on the list! but it is. best town for rich, single folks. >> this is not a huge surprise. the place where most single people are are college towns. rich and single, it is a beach town. newport beach, california. 30% of people who live there are single. the average median income there is over $140,000. it is a beautiful place. it has a great boardwalk. not too far from l.a. you can see why it would attract the young and affluent and professional singles. >> drum roll? the best town on the whole list is -- >> this will please you very much being a minnesota girl. number one place that we found overall that had the package of everything, eden prairie, minn
.c., maryland, virginia and west virginia and delaware say they felt it. wolf, did you feel it? you are in bethesda, right? >> yes, i felt it. i jumped out of bed and i didn't know what was going on. it lasted for 15 or 20 seconds and might not have lasted that long, but it shook me. you don't live far from me, and did you feel it? >> yeah, we both live in bethesda, maryland, and i did feel it and i knew what it was, because i have grown up in areas with earthquakes, so my husband and i both looked at each other and said earthquake, so we knew what was going on, but it was a little stunning, because it is not something that you encounter everyday? >> no, i have lived in this area for 35 years and i never have felt it. i have experienced earthquakes in california and mexico, so i knew what it was, but it was very strange. thank you very much. let's hope it does not happen again, and there are no aftershocks. >>> did disgruntled state workers collect data on people they suspected of being illegal immigrants, breaking the law themselves in the process? standby. >>> and also, concern ab
related death reported in the state of maryland. the governor there telling the people to take whatever steps necessary to try to stay cool. back here in new york, we did spend time at con-edison's command center to see what steps they are taking to deal with the heat. day four of the northeast heat wave brought some lower temperatures but not low enough in boston. >> one thing about people from south, we are not that bunch of whips. we will take it. >> reporter: record highs in philadelphia and wilmington, delaware, record sales of air conditioners in many new york city stores. >> i mean, they have been going as fast as they are coming in. >> reporter: the city's pools filling to capacity. >> it is refreshing and cool. and it is keeping us from passing out in the sun. >> reporter: demand for power, a concern in new york. con-edison has been running the emergency response center since tuesday. inside their war room, various departments work together to prevent blackouts. >> take a look around the room the center is broken up into different s logistics back here, customer service. back h
>>> joining me now, steny hoyer from my home state of maryland. >> good to be with you, candy. >> we laid out this is a tough year for democrats. can you give me some sense -- we know you had a meeting with the president and we heard some of your colleagues speak out loud about the tensions that exist. and it seems to me it's high anxiety time for the democrats. >> americans are very concerned about the status of their economy, about the unemployment that exists. they were angry in '06, and angry in '08 and changed leaderships, and angry in '10. we are not returning to the failed bush policies that brought us to this point, but focus on what is making progress. we have not succeeded yet, but we are making substantial progress. the economy is growing. we are creating jobs. frankly, we think when americans assess, do we want to go back, do we want to repeal the successes we have had and repeat the mistakes that we made that got us to this point, i think they will say they don't want to go back to the bush policies? >> i know you cannot sell a 9.5% unemployment rate, and you cannot sell mortgage
at the university of maryland. as you said, agriculture is hot. i'm not talking about urban farming. i'm talking about farming as in making your living off the land. >> brandywines, those are 3, these are 2. >> reporter: at the university farmer's market in baltimore, roy is selling tomatoes, squash and green, all vegetables he planted then harvested with his own hands. it's not exactly what he was born to do. he evolved. so i hear you went to yale? >> i did. >> reporter: what did you major in? >> i majored in history, the most useful of all subjects which will lead us into a career in -- anything. >> reporter: farming? >> farming, that's right, that's right. >> reporter: not that he regrets his yale education or the years spent in new york working in investment banking, both vividly taught him that world was not his. but this is. >> like for me, the magic of like seeing a cucumber on a vine was like a circle in my psyche had been connected. here's something that had been in front of me every day in my life growing up, and i never knew where it came from. >> reporter: for him, farming is spiritu
currency. he is an economist and professor at the maryland school of business. peter, let's get right to it. you say we either get china to play fair or we're headed for a depression. >> absolutely. if china doesn't play fair, there is not enough demand for what americans make. to create jobs, businesses need customers and capital. the customer side, there is just not enough demand for what americans make because we spend so much in china and it's not just its cheap labor. it underdefines its currency by 40%. either we're going to grow very slowly or we're going to tank, but we're not going to recover quickly enough to generate jobs. >> let's turn to richard quest who is host of cnn's "quest hee means business." $220 billion sounds like a gap we need to close, but china produces goods a lot more cheaply which means folks like me in america gets to pay less for things, so what's wrong with that? >> jessica, it's very simple the the day you are prepared to pay more for the t-shirts on your back ask tnd the shoes on your , that's the day they will be produced domestically again. peter may be r
through. we're getting a lot of intensity with it particularly in delaware and maryland. we've had reports of wind damage as the storms continue to persist. and roll across the jersey shore. working their way towards coastal delaware and certainly through the hamptons and long island. now up towards boston. up in boston the weather is not as intense as it is further south. i think it's much worse in the mid-atlantic in terms of severity. so some severe thunderstorm watches are in effect through 7:00 tonight. they may get extended longer than that. that includes new york and more of the western areas into new jersey. philadelphia, through dover, delaware and washington, d.c. these orange boxes you see here right now are severe thunderstorm warnings. even if it's not a tornado warning, you could get a sudden gust of wind at 60 miles per hour or even greater. so that makes it very damaging as well. we're tracking this severe weather. we're also tracking other stories across the country. you saw the threat, the dwf wildfires, this is important to know. parts of nevada and california are under
guy, to the everyday consumer? professor peter moricci from the university of maryland joins us. good to see you. >> nice to be with you. >> what immediate changes will we see with this? let's start with credit cards? >> well, credit cards will be clearer. for example, i have my latest bill from hsbc. it tells me if i make the minimum payment it will take me 20 years to pay it off and the interest charges will be almost double the principal that's here. if i make a larger payment it will take only three years to pay it off and the interest will be only 60%. >> okay. so let's move on now. interest will be only 60%. so that should help. >> right. >> okay. >> but the banks will make less money doing this. so you're going to see, you know, somewhat lower credit limits because the banks are going to be more cautious about extending too much credit to people. >> okay. >> things of that nature. >> let's move on now to checking accounts here. >> well, right now the banks don't make money by charging you to use a checking account. we have free checking. the checks are inexpensive. they make mo
rockville, maryland is where this epicenter is. 3.6 magnitude. as far as the depth is concerned, pretty shallow. three miles deep. so it was felt. we have a map that highlights, people that actually reported to the usgs to report the shaking. a little bit of light shaking felt in some spots of d.c. because it was so slal doe. but we don't expect any damage to be reported from this. 3.6 is certainly minor but in this region of the country i would consider it to be major. we'll let you know if there are any aftershocks. we don't expect a 7.0 or 8.0 magnitude aftershock following this one. we'll talk more about this and weather coming up. >> i grew up in gaithersburg, maryland. i don't think we ever felt an earthquake there. >> good old montgomery county. >> i don't ever recall any earthquakes. >> no, absolutely. that area is what i thought to be earthquake proof but evidently not. >>> it's been more than 14 hours since they were finally able to cap the raptured well and prevent the oil from spilling into the gulf. we've seen this live feed before for 87 days now. >> not like this. >> it i
at the cleveland clinic, he'll testify at today's hearings and joins us this morning from maryland. dr. nissen, thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> i'm sure you've reader this morning in the "new york times," they're reporting the makers of avandia found their drug to increase heart problems all the way back in 1999, a study conducted then, and they did not submit that data to federal drug regulators as is required by most cases by law. what do you make of allegations that perhaps senior management sought to bury this data because it was unfavorable toward their drug? >> well, comingality the 11th hour here before this advisory committee hearing, this certainly does not help them. there is lots of evidence they've known for a long time that their drug was harmful and sought to downplay it. unfortunately that will play out very badly for them at this hearing. >> so today the fda will decide over this course of two-day hearing avandia's fate. you published a study back in 2007 that started a lot of this, people who took avandia said, according to your research, you say they face 43% hig
. >> reporter: now, a half year later, she's on vacation in maryland visiting her grandparents. she started to talk, english an creole. and she's usually a happy exuberant child. >> she's usually a diva. she'll walk out of restaurants and be like bye guys. >> reporter: but her episodes of anger have proven fright thing to elizabeth. >> she'll pinch and bite. she'll sit me down and say no, mommy, giving me a time-out. she needs control back, that's what she's trying to do. >> reporter: jenna has been through much, elizabeth hopes she will soon outgrow her anger. but whatever happens, she wants her 2-year-old to know she will always be there for her. >> she's made my life so much richer, but like i said when i met you right after the earthquake, it's like she's always been here. she's special. >> such a beautiful little girl. it's great to see. so she's saying she's hearing from other parent that is maybe other kids are having similar issues? >> right. a lot of them are going through similar things. she's saying right now, she's going to love her daughter a lot, be there for her. she's going
home state of maryland. >> good to be with you, candy. >> we laid out this is a tough year for democrats. can you give me some sense, we know you had a meeting with the president. we have heard some of your colleagues speak out loud about the tensions that exist. it just seems to me a high anxiety time for democrats. >> i think it's a high anxiety time for the country and certainly for democrats and, by the way, for republicans as well. americans are very concerned about the status of their economy, about the unemployment that exists. they were angry in '06, angry in '08 and changed leaderships and they're angry in '10. what we're going to focus on is not returning to the failed bush policies that brought us to this point but focus on the efforts that we have made which are making progress. we haven't succeeded yet, but we are making substantial progress. the economy is growing. we are creating jobs. and very frankly we think that when americans assess do we want to go back, do we want to in fact repeal the successes we've had and repeat the mistakes that we've made that go
living in northern virginia or in montgomery county, maryland. >> southeast d.c. >> or southeast d.c. not far from national park. that unemployment in nevada is higher than michigan. how can that possibly be? harry reid is not just a senator, he's the majority leader and he has failed the fae of nevada. i think it's a good ad. >> straight here. you don't think that goes a little far? a bit of a stretch to believe all that bad stuff and the deficit and all that is obama and reid? >> i'm sorry. what were we talking about earlier? these are emotional reactions. logic and intellect have nothing to do with politics. >> he agrees of that -- >> i said it was good. >> the economy is the number one issue in that race. we'll see how it plays. >> everywhere. >> yes. >>> did taxes play role in lebron james decision to sign with the miami heat. our next question up. james said last night he wants a championship ring and money's not the issue. listen to this. >> well, the numbers are not finalized. i think my agent, leon rose, will take care of that, but all these of us are, all three are going
, the same programs that help them in prison, like, i'm trying to get something in maryland, like once they get out, that program they was in in prison, it can be the same program that they can fall back into when they come to society. when they come out to society. you know? and it starts there, too. you know, like don't just stop because -- don't stop because you're in prison and then come home. you know, keep going. just keep going. >> that's what they do in many cities. the second-chance act was the legislation that was passed that bush signed into law and it provided hundreds of millions of dollars for agencies around the country. and those are agencies that help ex-offenders and there are agencies that deter folks from becoming criminals. and one of the things that we do in our community center in detroit is to prevent and to rehabilitate. >> larry: do you think society believes in second chances? >> for the most part, many do. >> larry: may not verbalize it. >> yeah, may not verbalize it. >> larry: snoop, thanks. dog will remain with us. and we'll be back with sharon tate's sist
in maryland, like once they get out, that program they was in in prison, it can be the same program that they can fall back into when they come to society. when they come out to society. you know? and it starts there, too. you know, like don't just stop because -- don't stop because you're in prison and then come home. you know, keep going. just keep going. >> that's what they do in many cities. the second-chance act was the t0 of crime. how do you approach this whole system of rehabilitation? >> well, actually, larry, it's a surprise to most people, but i do believe in rehabilitation. there are so much yo -- sociopaths and psychopaths that need to stay behind bars forever, but there are a lot of people that don't fall into that category and we definitely needpsychopaths that need to stay behind bars forever, but there are a lot of people that don't fall into that category and we definitely need to have in place people in place to rehabilitate. >> larry: one of the people who killed your sister i interviewed her and she claimed to be rehabilitated. would you want her released? >> th
: silver spring, maryland, hello. >> hi, larry. thanks for taking my call. my question is, i honestly cannot understand how it is that barack obama has been in office for what now a year, a year and a half and he's getting blamed for all of the things that basically transpired throughout the bush administration. >> thank you. >> eight years. >> you have the smartest callers. >> i think he's blamed primarily for spending a great deal of money without much effect. and i think otherwise he's not getting blamed for much but the stimulus package of roughly $1 trillion. it doesn't seem to have had much effect, and i think that's upset people. it's quite a lot of money he threw -- >> larry: he got a health bill through. >> but it doesn't really take effect for about four years for most americans so we won't know how that works. but the spending is upsetting. >> ben, you can't -- we were losing 700,000 jobs a month when he took office. the stimulus -- you can argue about how many jobs, but somewhere around two or three million jobs it's created. you can't say -- >> the white house report just
national seashore on maryland's coast, home to the small, fluffy, piping plovers. it's nesting time for these endangered birds. since 1986 they've been protected. >> these plovers nest in these open, sandy areas right directly on the ground. there are a number of animals here on the island that would just love to make a meal out of those eggs. so those cages protect those eggs from things like crows, fox, some other birds. so it's an attempt to help give that bird, this rare bird a little leg up. >> we've probably got somewhere in the neighborhood of 80 or 90 birds. >> reporter: that doesn't seem like a lot. >> well, it's not. >> reporter: now another threat. the massive oil spill along the gulf coast where the piping plover migrates in winter. these pictures of oil-covered birds could foreshadow the plover's fate. because of the concern a team of scientists tagged and took blood samples from the birds to record their condition before they migrate south. >> the idea is to try to over the course of this coming year recapture some of those birds down in their wintering grounds, take a
excessively hot. in maryland, for example, they have already equaled the number of heat-related deaths offant. they have for all of last year. today in washington, d.c., baltimore, 100 degrees expected. at land da with 89 degrees. 85 in northerly. 85 in miami. all cooler than what to expect in parts of the northeast. 93 in kansas city. the only thing heating up is the tropics as they are getting active. coming up, we'll give you the full scope of the tropical weather. back to you, kyra. >> thank you, reynolds. >>> so did you wake up this morning with your ears ringing after celebrating america's birthday? check out this spectacular fireworks display at the washington monument. last night the nation's capital put on quite a celebration for the fourth of july. >>> and thomas jefferson says the cement of this union is the heartblood of every american, even heartbreaking americans can celebrate the fourth. the entire gulf region finally forgot the gulf disaster for a little while. and new york harbor exploded into a blaze of color. this is the view on the west side of atlanta. he probably hasn't
of the university of maryland center for environmental science. also on this panel, there's terry garcia, a "national geographic" society executive and cherry murray, dean of harvard's school of engineering school. francis ulme, lance chore of the university of alaska anchorage. there is no one from the oil and gas commission and that omission has been at the is center of the criticism of the panel. >> yes. when we look at this, that is the center of the argument. and we look at the issue of objectivity and don't have any representation from the oil company or from the oil industry. how is that going to affect their efficacy going forward once they come forward with what their findingings are? >> i actually spoke with the panel's communication director this morning about the criticism and he says that they just hired a science adviser who worked for 30 years at shell as a deepwater drilling engineer. i asked if it was in response to all of this criticism and he said no, they were planning to do that all along. you know, there have been pretty harsh words. take a listen to this op-ed from
, we want to lift up capital brian matthew bunting of potomac, maryland, a member of new york army's national guard's 27th infantry brigade combat team. his wife submitted this message he recorded for her when at the first arrived in afghanistan. >> hey, i want to accepted you this message to say hello and i'm doing fine. this is my little room back here in kandahar. i've got to move some things around. shuffling people around who are staying here longer. i'll get it in ship shape and put plenty of pictures of you all on the walls. i wanted to send this message and tell you i love you and think about you all of the time. >> oh, that west point grad was one of four soldiers killed when a roadside bomb detonated near his vehicle in kandahar, afghanistan, on february 24th, 2008. the couple were trying to have another child but his wife nikki found out she was pregnant four days after he was killed. matthew bunting was 29 years old we want to hear your stories about such sacrifice. go to our website, put your service member's name in, pull up the profile and add your memories. put in p
's also francis bineke and donald bosch, president of the university of maryland center for environmental science. also on the seven-member commission, terry garcia, a national gee gaffic society executive. finally, there's francis oelmer. so, tony, did you notice that there's no one from the oil and gas industry on this commission? >> can i tell you, we talked to so many people impacted by this in the gulf. that's the number one complaint we hear about this commission. so the question is can this commission really be objective? >> well, that's the question. of course, the critics are saying no. i asked this of the panel's communications director this morning. and he says that they just hired a science adviser who worked for 30 years at shell as a deep water drilling engineer. i asked if that was in response to all of the criticism and he says no, that they are planning to do that all along. you know, tony the comments have been pretty harsh. check out this op-ed. instead of appointing unbiased scientists and engineers and drilling experts, the president appointed extreme environmentalist
for hundreds of thousands of people in d.c., maryland and virginia. the race is on to get everyone back on the grid. it is supposed to be over 90 degrees in d.c. today. getting to work this morning won't be a picnic, either. lots of traffic and a lot of lights not working. metro d.c. is part of the severe weather pattern this morning. heavy rains in the midwest, flooded roads in chicago, a big hole punched in a dam in iowa. jacqui jeras, what a busy morning. >>> what a weekend. i was trying to think of the one weather phenomenon that didn't occur this weekend, and the only thing i could come up with was blizzard. pretty extreme, but we have serious moments. i want to talk more about the dam fall your in northeast iowa. we had incredible amounts of rainfall that caused record flo flooding on the river here. it is a nine-mile lake called lake delhi. it etchtied in a matter of hours flooding hundreds of homes and cabins. it is primarily a recreational lake. so people like to use this for boating and fissioning. amazingly, nobody was injured when this happened. and the sirens did go off to
that this is an idea that has happened in new jersey and maryland and illinois and hawaii who have also voted for this proposal and that is 73 electoral votes. this initiative will not gain enough steam until the states that could total 270 electoral votes will come up to make the difference. how do i feel about it personally? look, i know a wrong was done in 2000, and on that, but i d believe that the voters out there deserve an opportunity to have people voting out there to say who is in the white house. >> we will leave it there. all right. donna, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> well, it is the big mystery of the disaster in the gulf. where did all of the oil go? two experts are standing by to explain what happened, and whether there is still a threat that we cannot see. >>> and parting shots of those russians who were sent back home in a spy swap. [ male announcer ] the financial headlines can be unsettling. but what if there were a different story? of one financial company that grew stronger through the crisis. when some lost their way, this company led the way. by protecting clients
in the washington, d.c. area, in rockville, maryland. but how about the temperatures? it is now 98 degrees in washington, d.c. numbers are going up from there. watch out for a really hot day and also possibly a stormy one. we're monitoring a bunch of thunderstorms that are kind of working their way across the northeast. you can see it sliding into upstate new york, down through pennsylvania. these are on the move so later do you could see some powerful storms across a good portion of the east. hot in three places. mid-atlantic, down to the south and certainly in the central plains and much of the mid south, including tennessee. phoenix and las vegas, places that are always hot but really hot with numbers into the upper triple digits. heavy rain is working its way into upstate new york. this will help reduce the heat but not yet. heat advisories are still in place for philadelphia and washington. it's been one hot summer for the mid-atlantic. it is also hot i cross areas of oklahoma into arkansas as well. heat index today of 115 degrees. this has to be one of the hottest days so far this ye
and new jersey and maryland have already taken steps to do an end run around the electoral college, saying they will give all of their states electoral votes to the candidate who wins the popular vote nationwide. now, beyond that, we have massachusetts possibly coming on board, if the governor signs this thing. and a fistful of other states possibly heading that way. and it would work like this. of if, for example, you had massachusetts over here, which is pretty solidly blue, and they voted for a democrat, but more voters nationwide wanted a republican candidate, under this rule what would happen is massachusetts would then give its 12 electoral votes to the gop candidate who make sure the republican who won the popular vote also won the election. these laws are written so that no state will do this unless enough others go along to make it effective. but this is aimed at heading off problems like the one we saw in 2000 when al gore won more popular votes but then lost the election to george bush because of the electoral vote. rick? >> know what i'm looking at? i'm looking at this thing an
. they are causing some problems. i have one flash flood warning in maryland right now. so that means we're going to see a lot of water coming through quickly. be careful if you're driving through the baltimore area. what if flying? look what's going on. big-time delays happening this busy saturday morning in july. laguardia, 1:15. that holds true for jfk. newark, knowledge knowledge, delays. philadelphia, 45 minutes. increasing in westchester county, white plains, hour delay. t.j. and kate, breaking the heat but causing delays at the airport. >> certainly you well know. >> exactly. but i'm here. >>> the immigration debate rages on. and there is a new angle. >> yes. one man is running for governor. children born of undocumented i'm grammigrants should not be . we're going to hear from him and others, a new hot debate, contentious part of the immigration debate. that is coming up. stay with us. >>> top of the hour here now. it could be the next hot button phase of the immigration debate in this country, do children born to illegal immigrants deserve to be american citizens? you remember this from
at this housing fair in washington. >> that would be $508 that you are working on. >> this woman from maryland is one of them. >> we have been struggling, juggling bills around because we know that the mortgage is the most important bill and we want to get help now before we get too far behind and end up losing the house. >> reporter: after an orientation with nonprofit housing experts and talking with a counselor, sanders then gets to sit down face to face with her lender to hash out better terms. >> on to the bank. >> reporter: bank representatives say it makes sense to help people like sanders who are trying to stay afloat. >> the cash is still flowing to the investor and the banks and the home owner gets to stay in their home. what is a great value add for anybody. >> not just saving homes but marriages and in some cases saving livings. >> reporter: their loan modification process has been criticized for not doing enough to help home owners. timothy geithner says it's off to a slow start but the administration is helping. >> we brought stability to house prices, interest rates have come do
reported in the state of maryland. the governor there urging people to take whatever steps necessary to stay cool. meanwhile, here in new york city, we spent sometime at kon edison's command center to see what steps they're taking to deal with the heat. day four of the northeast heat wave brought some lowered temperatures, but not low enough in boston. one thing about guys people from the south, we're not that bunch of wimps, we'll take it. >> record highs in several eastern cities, including philadelphia, and wilmington, delaware. record sales of air conditioners in many new york city stores. >> they've been going out as fast as they come in. >> the city's pools, filling to capacity. >> it's refreshing, it's cool. and it's keeping us from passing out in the sun. >> demand for power, a concern in new york. where con edison has been running its emergency response center since tuesday. >> the low is 12,525 megawatts. >> inside their war room, various departments work together to prevent blackouts. the center is broken up into different sections, logistics, customer service. back over t
of that has to do with the rain coming through. impressively hot. record breaking heat for baltimore, maryland, where the temperature climbed to 105 degrees. ten deaths were caused by this heat. it's very serious when you have heat advisories for days and heat wave that lasts almost an entire week. let's show you what's going on right now. here's a look at the rain. zoom in right here at the washington, d.c./baltimore area. thunderstorms rolling through the region. then it gets more intense as you head towards new jersey and into new england. these storms, as i said, are all part of a cold front that brought heavier rain to the midwest earlier this week. now the rain is going to slide off to the east and bring about relief to the eat. highs today in the mid atlantic and northeast, 80. so much better than 102 degrees. it will still be very hot and unfortunately a little stormy for parts of the gulf coast. we had powerful thunderstorms roll through the atlanta area overnight. here's what's happening in new orleans. this is where our heat advisory is. biloxi will be feeling the heat as well. the
's on vacation in maryland visiting her grandparents. she started to talk. english and creole. she's usually a happy and exuberant child. >> she really is a diva. >> you mean that very affecti affectiona affectionately. >> she'll walk out of restaurants and go, buy guys. >> reporter: her episodes of danger are increasing. >> she hits and she bites a lot. she'll sit me down and say, no, mommy, try and put me in time-out of some sort. >> give you the time-out. >> she needs control back is what she's trying to do. >> reporter: though jenna has been through much, elizabeth hopes she will soon outgrow her anger. but no matter what happens, she wants her 2-year-old to know she will always be there for her. >> she has made me life so much richer but also just like i said, when i met you right after the earthquake, it's like she's always been here. she's special. >> reporter: gary tuchman, cnn, port-au-prince, haiti. >>> hello again, everyone. i'm tony harris. top of the hour in the "cnn newsroom" where anything can happen. here are some of the peep behind today's top stories. tempers flare as the i
, maryland auto dealer jack fitzgerald. four of his auto franchises were lost. >> it was wrong. it was obviously wrong. anyone in the business knows that that was wrong. it was a mistake. it was really hurting chrysler and gm. it wasn't helping them. and it was hurting the economy. everything about it was wrong. it was a bad idea. >> reporter: as the economy was in a tail spin in early 2009, auto companies were required by the obama administration to restructure as a condition to receiving federal bailout money. but a new report from the special inspector general overseeing the t.a.r.p. bailout program found the president's auto task force largely ignored the impact on jobs. the inspector general says in fact the auto dealership closings were not vital to the survival of the automakers. >> as suggested in their letter if they hadn't done this accelerated job loss for the dealership closings that this somehow would have put the auto companies in jeopardy? that they would have failed immediately? it's just not true. we saw nothing to support that. >> reporter: the report comes ju
. >> reporter: now a half year later, she's on vacation in maryland visiting her grandparents. she's starting to talk and she's usually a happy and exuberant child. >> she really is a diva. >> reporter: you mean that affectionately? >> she'll walk out of restaurants and say, bye, guys. she pinches and she bites. she hits a lot. she'll sit me down and say, no, mommy, like try and put me in time-out of some sort. >> reporter: giving you the time-out. >> she needs control back. that's what she's trying to do. >> reporter: though jenna's been through much, elizabeth hopes she will soon outgrow her anger. but no matter what happens, she wants her 2-year-old to know she will always be there for her. >> she has made my life so much richer, but also just -- like i said when i met you right after the earthquake, it's like she's always been here. she's special. >> reporter: these are trying times for this new mother. but i've known elizabeth now for almost six months. we've become friends and i would bet my rent money that she and jenna will thrive. richard? >> gary, great piece. i was noticing how emo
at the university of maryland. joining us live from our washington bureau. you heard the president. short and sweet. is it enough, peter? >> no. it is a pail of water on a construction fire. it is great to bring in internet access but hardly a jobs program at a time 12 months into the recovery only 83,000 private sector jobs created when we need to create 13 million by the end of 2013 to bring unemployment back down to 6%. >> i read your article and it scared me. here is the title. "double dip or off the cliff." i don't think any of us -- then again, i think a lot of americans feel like they have fallen off the cliff. your predictions? >> well, if we take a second dip and that is starting to materialize, the economy won't recover so quickly. the economy has nationally -- natural recession qualities and those will have been spent. for example, people refinancing their north gajs when interest rates went down. first time they went down they did that and it was a gush of spending. now interest rates and mortgages is down again. but no one qualifies to refinance. >> you point out why this is happening.
in the severe weather center. jacqui, i want boston, my home state of maryland, new york city to open up those cooling stations right now. >> it's so important, too, because we're getting new information about power outages. about 1400 people now in new york city don't have power, up from a couple hundred earlier today. you have to conserve your energy and your power usage because it's dangerous out there and the temperatures all right well into the 90s. we will see temperatures in the triple digits and this will be the hottest day in a decade for many of you. some records will be broken or close. we think new york will get there at 101. boston won't quite get there but it will feel brutal. heat indices between 100 and 105 drooes. it's focussed from boston down towards washington, d.c. even into richmond, virginia, where you get into the action. heat advisories and warnings continue to be in effect across the entire area. many of this still in effect through tomorrow and we'll watch that heat lessen a little later in the week. the high pressure is holding much of the eastern's weather but the
we did about an hour ago. >> unless you're in frederick, maryland, just checked in at 104 degrees about ten minutes ago. nicole, stay cool. you look very fresh out there. >> yeah, nicole, you must be under a tree. i was going to say the same thing. >> is an air conditioner blowing on you somewhere? >> i've been hiding in the truck. >> thanks a lot. thanks, chad. >>> well, it took 78 days, but oil from the bp spill has now gotten on shore in every single state along the gulf coast. the latest one was texas. tar balls have shown up on the sand in galveston, texas for the first time. beaches now affected along a 550-mile stretch from texas to northern florida. >>> a bit of a setback in the clean-up, too. a huge navy blimp. that one right there was supposed to arrive in the gulf today. is delayed. friday is the date now because of bad weather. the air ship, what's it going to do? help with the clean-up by pinpointing pockets of oil threatening to hit the shore and also spotting wildlife. >>> and the massive cargo ship that's been converted to an oil skimmer being put to the test today
height the size of the spill was the size of maryland. now it's smaller than delaware. >> but the devastation is enormous. 600 miles of gulf coast shoreline have been stained. $22 billion in potential revenue lost. over 2,600 helpless animals rescued in the face of an oily death. but according to a top coast guard official, the worst may now be behind us. >> i had over 800 skimmers out yesterday and across the entire region they've only recovered one barrel of recoverable oil so the oil really is in its final life cycle, if you will. it is starting to break down quite rapidly. where it will pose each day less and less of a threat to the environment. >> because of what we can't see, it could be months, even years before we know the full extent of the damage that's been done to the gulf of mexico. >> rob marciano is live for us this morning in florida. even though there may not be oil on the surface of the water in such quantity ties as we saw ine past, we find out today the oil does not always leave an obvious stain. >> reporter: that is certainly true. good morning, gu
that the president was saying that in the rose garden, the first lady was in maryland with the first lady of mexico talking to some young students and there was a second-grader, i believe, who asked first lady michelle obama, about immigration reform, sort of an unscripted moment and basically said, look, my mom believes that president obama wants to kick people out of the country and was saying that her own mom was not legal, an unscripted moment for this white house. it's come up a lot, t.j. >> our ed henry at the white house. ed, always good to see you. appreciate your perspective and appreciate that memory. remembering so many of those moments that have happened along the way with the president on this immigration debate. >>> stay with us here. the idea behind arizona's controversial immigration law. it is the focus of today's "wordplay." >>> still time for a little "wordplay" today. we're talking about the arizona immigration law. sb 1070 known as the support our law enforcement and safe neighborhoods ak. they list it as promoting, quote, attrition through enforcement, end quote. we have heard
of the united states where main street is this 20-mile ring around ft. meade, maryland which is north of washington, d.c. and within that area virtually everybody works for or is connected to the nsa or some other intelligence community, and in street signs that are in the medians of roads, as you drive through it, rather than it being houses for sale, it's cleared job fairs and other kinds of top-secret activities. i mean the people who live there are sort of all aware of the fact that this is a hub of the intelligence establishment, but to the rest of america, places like ft. meade, aurora, colorado, tampa, florida, san antonio, texas, those places might be represented to them as the alamo and yet in reality, they are something completely different when one scratches the surface. >> for the conspiracy theorists, it is a quite interesting read. you talk about what happens to your gps in a car, let's say, when you get close to the nsa, the national security agency. you sort of start getting put in these incorrection directions, a series of u-turns. it is fascinating what you reveal ab
from baltimore, sherillyn ifill, a law professor at the university of maryland and a civil rights lawyer. welcome. >> thanks for having me. >> from louisville, kentucky, boyce watkins, founder of yourblackworld.com and a professor at syracuse, university. you say the president has to do more on race. you hear a lot of anger from the african-american community. some might say though he has so much on his plate, oil spill, the struggling economy, two wars. what more do you think the president himself should be doing when it comes to the issue of race relations? >> well, i think the president was hoping -- and i think it is understandable -- that what he does on race would be in his substantive policies, the revitalized civil rights division, what he's trying to do extending unemployment benefits, what he's tried to do in stimulating the economy and so forth and even the real and sincere efforts of the usda to deal with backlogged civil rights claims. so i think the president was hoping that substantive policy would be enough. but the reality is, race happens. it happened last summer
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